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RSPCA Policy E04 Utilisation of wild animals

Article ID: 424
Last updated: 01 Dec, 2010
Revision: 1
Views: 4109
 4.1 Farming of wild animals
 4.1.1

RSPCA Australia is opposed to the taking of animals from the wild for the purpose of farming (defined as the breeding, rearing and slaughter of animals for commercial purposes), due to the risk of pain, injury or distress arising from the capture, transport, handling and long-term confinement of these animals, and potential effects on the ecosystem from where they are taken.

See B6 Farming of non-domesticated species
See H1 Fur or skin production

 4.2 Hunting of wild animals
 4.2.1

RSPCA Australia is opposed to the hunting of any animal for sport.

See C5 Hunting of animals for sport

 4.2.2 RSPCA Australia is opposed to open seasons on duck, quail, deer and other ‘game’ species, and to the breeding and release of animals into ‘game parks’ for the purpose of hunting for sport.
 4.2.3 Where wild animals are legitimately hunted for subsistence, this must be conducted humanely and with regard for the conservation status of the species involved.
 4.3 Killing of wild animals for commercial purposes
 4.3.1 RSPCA Australia is opposed to the killing of wild animals for commercial utilisation (i.e. for food or other animal products) unless this is carried out as part of a wild animal management program that meets the criteria specified in Policy E2.
 4.4 Keeping of wild animals as pets
 4.4.1 RSPCA Australia is opposed to the taking of animals from the wild to be kept as pets due to the risk of pain, injury or distress arising from the capture, transport, handling and long-term confinement of these animals, and potential effects on the ecosystem from where they are taken.
 4.4.2 RSPCA Australia believes that captive-bred wild animals should not be kept as pets unless the species has been clearly identified as being suitable for this purpose.
 4.4.3 Characteristics which indicate suitability for a species to be kept as a pet include:
 
  • readily available accurate information on the husbandry, care and veterinary treatment of the species
  • availability of suitably experienced veterinarians
  • the physiological, social and behavioural needs of the species can readily be met in a home environment
  • the behavioural attributes of the species are compatible throughout its lifetime with being kept in a home environment
  • the species poses no significant health or public safety risk to humans or other animals.
 4.4.4 Any proposals for the keeping of endangered native animals as pets as a means of promoting their conservation must adequately address the above characteristics and any additional conservation, ecological or animal welfare issues arising.


(adopted 06/12/10)


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Also read
document What is the RSPCA's policy on the farming of wild animals?
document Is it legal to hunt protected species such as marine turtles and dugongs?
document Can turtles and dugongs be killed humanely using traditional hunting methods?

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RSPCA Policy E03 Rescue and rehabilitation of wild animals     RSPCA Policy E05 Public exhibition of wild animals